A full moon walk last winter.

A full moon walk last winter.

If you follow us regularly, you know how we feel about full moons. Every month (errr . . . lunar cycle) the boys eagerly await the night of the full moon because with it comes our family’s tradition of a full moon walk before bed. Whether we can see the moon or not, out we go to celebrate it.

On November 13 and 14, we’ll be treated to a particularly rare and beautiful “supermoon”. Read on to learn about what causes a supermoon and how you can enjoy it together as a family.

What is a Moon Cycle?

Lunar Cycle Diagram

Lunar Cycle Diagram

You may already be familiar with the basics of the moon cycle, but just to review, the moon orbits the earth every 27.3 days. As the moon orbits the earth, one half of it is always illuminated by the sun, just as one half of the earth is always illuminated by the sun (the side of the earth experiencing daylight). Here on earth, we cannot always see the part of the moon that is illuminated and the part of the moon that we can see changes slightly each night according to its location relative to the sun. During most of its cycle we see just part of the moon’s illuminated side and part of the shadowed side. When we see a crescent moon, we are actually seeing just a small bit of the side that’s illuminated and the remainder of the shadowed side (which we can’t distinguish from darkness so far away). Check out the Lunar Cycle Diagram to get a better idea of how this works.

What is a Supermoon?

426px-apogee_psf-svg

Moon’s Orbit Diagram

But wait, there’s more! The moon’s orbit isn’t exactly round. Although it is depicted as perfectly circular in most diagrams (including the one above), the moon’s orbit is actually almost elliptical – meaning it’s more of an oval shape. This is true of all orbits due to variations in gravitational pull, initial velocity of the orbiting bodies, and any other disturbances such as collisions. Because of this, the moon’s distance from earth varies between approximately 357,000 kilometers (222,000 mi) and 406,000 km (252,000 mi). The moon’s location closest to earth is called perigee while its location furthest from earth is called apogee. See the Moon’s Orbit Diagram for a visual.

When a full moon occurs at the perigee, it is often referred to as a Supermoon. These moons appear 13% larger and shine 30% brighter than a typical full moon. The Supermoon we will experience next week is the closest full moon we’ve experienced since 1948 and a full moon won’t be this close again until 2034. That means this is the closest full moon in a period of 86 years!

How Can We Celebrate?

The moon rises over the bay.

The moon rises over the bay.

Full Moon Walk

Our family celebrates the full moon by going for a walk before bedtime. We do this not just for Supermoons, but every full moon, regardless of the weather and visibility. Next week, rather than walking down our street, we will go someplace special to walk by moonlight.

Aside from the full moon walk, here are some other great ideas to mark this special lunar event:

Meditate

Did you have a stressful month? We sure did. Between The Captain transitioning to a new rotation on his tugboat, the melancholy of days getting shorter, and the presidential election (I can’t even go there yet), this past month has seemed far from peaceful around here. Buddhists mark the full moon with a day of spiritual focus, meditating and keeping away from worldly distractions. Historically, ancient sages have advised the same thing – to take time on the full moon day to relax your mind and devote time to spiritual development.

If you’ve felt the emotional weight of the past month heavy on your shoulders, take some time under the full moon to be present in the moment. It doesn’t have to be fancy, and you don’t need to have any experience with meditation. Just go outside, find a comfortable place to sit or lie down, and focus on breathing and clearing your mind. Try taking a deep breath in through your nose, holding it for a moment, and exhaling through your mouth. Let your mind clear and allow yourself to be present in the moment. This can be hard for kids, but even young children can attempt it. Challenge a child to sit quietly and soak up the moon’s beauty for the same number of minutes as their age.

Dance

Full moons are, not surprisingly, a symbol of fullness. They mark the highest of high tides and many believe they spark the height of creativity and power. One of our favorite ways to release this fullness is through dance. When our house gets too crazy, too loud, and too full, we put on some music and we dance. It’s often a raucous party with the kids quite literally bouncing off the walls, but when it’s over they are tired and subdued, at least for a moment. Try having your own dance party outside under the moon. Choose whatever music feels right to you and dance with wild abandon.

Bring the light inside

Full moons bring light to an otherwise dark place. One of the reasons we love our full moon walks so much is that the night is normally a time of darkness when we can’t easily enjoy the same places that we do during the day. The full moon helps us to see that there’s nothing to be afraid of after the sun goes down. As a symbol of your appreciation, light a candle outside under the moon, then bring it inside with you. Try having bath time or stories by the light of your candle. There is something simple and peaceful about enjoying everyday activities by the light of a candle’s flickering glow.

Read a moon story

There are many beautiful books about the moon. Goodnight Moon is a staple of many bedtimes, but the list goes on from there. Here are some of our favorites:

Wings Across the Moon by Linda Hargrove

The House in the Night by Susan Marie Swanson

Red Knit Cap Girl by Naoko Stoop

If You Decide to Go to the Moon by Faith McNulty

Owl Moon by Jane Yolen

In our house, bedtime stories are a way of winding down and enjoying each other’s company before bed. We snuggle up in a cozy spot and read together before turning off the lights to continue with some songs. Moon stories are a great way to cap off the night of a full moon, and even better if you decide to enjoy them outside, under the moon.

This month’s full moon is definitely one for the ages. How will you mark the occasion with your family?

The boys watch the full moon across the water on Christmas 2015.